Podcasts

Over the winter I digitized close to 100 cassette tapes from my old late-night radio show, Technological Retreat. These podcast programs will be collections of the live mixes, or Sound Collages I enjoyed making in the middle of the night in the 20th century. These weren’t sample or dance based mixes. More like soundtracks from the subconscious that could last moments, or stretch on and on into that place when darkness turns into dawn.

Now available in conveniently sized travel packets, Technological Retreat is online through the help and assistance of KFAI and will soon be available wherever you get your podcasts from. Now you can take a Technological Retreat with you when ever and where ever you go. It’s the kind of thing you might have heard before, but not really. Be sure to try some today.

If you are a member of Spotify, these shows are all listed there as well.

Episode one begins with a station ID and two mixes from January 13, 1986. The station ID and intro are done by Larry Englund, recently departed and much-loved person within the KFAI world. This recording was made when KFAI used a boombox to record air checks with. It sounds like it wasn’t tuned in very well that night. This first mix began around 2:20 AM, the second mix featured began around 4:40 AM.

The second episode  has three of the mixes I referred to as Sound Collages. That’s what I called them but I don’t think I necessarily invented the phrase. I had done late night radio in college, before moving to Minneapolis in 1985, and enjoyed having a lot of time to play a lot of different music. Having an overnight show on KFAI allowed me to stumble through and experiment with this style of sound and to be able to really stretch the mixes out. What was essential, was the feeling of being artistically free to create. These first two mixes were originally broadcast on January 21st, 1986. The first one started around 2:20 AM and is about ten minutes long. The second began before 3 AM and is under 20 minutes. The third mix was originally broadcast in February of 1986, started around 2:30 AM and is about half an hour long.

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